Project Lettertype design IV.

The ones that close the inspiration are…

Anish Kapoor (1954) is an Indian-born British sculptor. Kapoor has lived and worked in London since the early 1970s when he moved to study art. Anish Kapoor became known in the 1980s for his geometric or biomorphic sculptures made using simple materials such as granite, limestone, marble, pigment and plaster. These early sculptures are frequently simple, curved forms, usually monochromatic and brightly coloured, using powder pigment to define and permeate the form. In the late 1980s and 1990s, he was acclaimed for his explorations of matter and non-matter, specifically evoking the void in both free-standing sculptural works and ambitious installations. Many of his sculptures seem to recede into the distance, disappear into the ground or distort the space around them. In 1987, he began working in stone. His later stone works are made of solid, quarried stone, many of which have carved apertures and cavities, often alluding to, and playing with dualities (earth-sky, matter-spirit, lightness-darkness, visible-invisible, conscious-unconscious, male-female and body-mind). Since 1995, he has worked with the highly reflective surface of polished stainless steel. These works are mirror-like, reflecting or distorting the viewer and surroundings. Over the course of the following decade Kapoor’s sculptures ventured into more ambitious manipulations of form and space. Kapoor constructed Britain’s largest piece of public art, The ArcelorMittal Orbit that served as observation tower during the 2012 Olympic Games in Stratford, London.

Anish Kapoor

 

 

Yayoi Kusama (1929) is a Japanese artist and writer. Throughout her career she has worked in a wide variety of media, including painting, collage, sculpture, performance art and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition and pattern. A precursor of the pop art, minimalist and feminist art movements. Kusama is now acknowledged as an important voice of the avant-garde. By 1950, Kusama was depicting abstracted natural forms in watercolor, gouache and oil, primarily on paper. She began covering surfaces (walls, floors, canvases, and later, household objects and naked assistants) with the polka dots that would become a trademark of her work. During her time in the U.S., she quickly established her reputation as a leader in the avant-garde movement. She was enormously productive, and by 1966, she was experimenting with room-size, freestanding installations that incorporated mirrors, lights, and piped-in music. In 1973, Kusama returned to Japan. She continued to paint, but now in high-colored acrylics on canvas, on an amped-up scale.

Yayoi Kusama

 

 

Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draughtsman and printmaker. In 1922 he moved to Paris to study and it was there that Giacometti experimented with cubism and surrealism and came to be regarded as one of the leading surrealist sculptors. Between 1936 and 1940, Giacometti concentrated his sculpting on the human head, focusing on the sitter’s gaze. Obsessed with creating his sculptures exactly as he envisaged through his unique view of reality, he often carved until they were as thin as nails and reduced to the size of a pack of cigarettes, much to his consternation. His paintings underwent a parallel procedure. The figures appear isolated, are severely attenuated, and are the result of continuous reworking. He attempted to create renditions of his models the way he saw them, and the way he thought they ought to be seen.

 Alberto Giacometti
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About lerusho

I am obsessed with experimenting, using my fantasy and creating new and unique visions. The challenges are endless and that gives me real inspiration.
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